Posted in promotion

Come Join our Twitter Chat!

 

 

 

Hello everyone! I hope all is well with you. I’m back today with a quick announcement. I am going to be participating in a Twitter chat this Thursday at 9 PM EST.  We’ll be using the hashtag #Leafypages.

We’ll be discussing trends in the YA genre and anything else that comes to mind. I’d love to see you all there, so if you’re another author, or reader, or just love twitter chats, come join the fun! You’ll be glad you did!

Can’t wait to see you there!

Lisa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Posted in Family, Holiday Posts

Happy Easter!

 

Happy Easter everyone. I hope you’re enjoying your holiday. Here are some photos of some decorated Easter eggs to help you celebrate!

 

 

I don’t know about you, but to me, Easter is the beginning of Spring. It’s that milestone that means the bitter cold days of winter are over and the spring thaw has started.  It’s a festive day for my family. We go over to my mother’s for a big ham dinner and then we play cards or just sit around the table and chat. It’s a great time to reminisce. Sadly, my dad isn’t there to share in the festivities and neither is my sister-in-law, Mindy. Both passed away before their time. Even though, they’re no longer with us, we have many great memories of both of them and they come up in the stories we tell. I believe that even though we can’t see them, they’re with us, celebrating and laughing right along with us.

So enjoy your family while you still can and make those memories count!  🙂

Photo credit: Maia C via Visual Hunt / CC BY-NC-ND

 

Thanks for stopping by and reading this short, celebratory post! Now, go have fun with your family! 🙂

Posted in Entertainment

The Flying Wallendas

 

Hello everyone. I hope all is well with you. Have you ever wanted to run off to the circus? I know when I was younger I wanted to join. That’s why when I was thinking about what to write for today’s post, I googled “what happened on March 22nd in history” and found out about Karl Wallenda. He was a high wire artist and reading about him brought back some great memories of trips to the circus with my dad.

Karl Wallenda was the founder of the Flying Wallendas, and he died on March 22nd, 1978 after falling ten stories from a tight rope during a promotional appearance in San Juan Puerto Rico.

Photo credit: UpNorth Memories – Donald (Don) Harrison via Visual hunt /CC BY-NC-ND

 

That day,  Karl perched on a wire stretched between the two towers of the Condado Plaza Hotel. He  worked without a safety net. I find this utterly amazing. What a daredevil. He was seventy three when he fell.

He was born into an old circus family and began performing at the age of six. His love for the high wire continued to grow as he matured, and he created a family business that traveled throughout Europe performing some incredible feats.

In 1928 John Ringling saw them performing in Cuba and quickly hired them for the Ringling Brothers Barnham and Bailey Circus. They debuted at Madison Square Garden without a safety net. It had been lost in transit.

In the years to come, Karl would develop some incredible acts, one of these being the seven person chair pyramid. The Flying Wallendas continued performing these feats until 1962, when, while at the Shrine Circus at Detroit’s State Fair Coliseum, the front man on the wire faltered, and the pyramid collapsed resulting in various injuries and deaths.

In 1970 He crossed the Tallulah Gorge on a high wire and did two headstands in the process.

Photo credit: roystonford via VisualHunt.com / CC BY-NC-SA

 

I’ve always been fascinated by the skill and concentration of the high wire acts I’ve seen throughout my life. It would’ve been nice to see Karl Wallenda perform. I know some of his descendants still perform today. What an amazing family.

Thanks for stopping by and reading my post today. I wanted to share some history with you just for a change of pace. Have you ever seen the Flying Wallendas? Leave a comment, I’d love to hear from you.

Posted in promotion, Writing

Writing. It’s not for Sissies

 

Hello everyone. I hope all is well with you.  I’m back today and I’m talking about how writing isn’t  for sissies. Why do I say this? Because not only after slaving over our masterpiece for hours and days on end (sometimes years), we have to face that notorious foe, rejection. If we’re lucky enough to get published, we then have to market our books and network with other authors.  I know we’re introverts. We like to be in our writing caves tapping away at that keyboard, creating our next masterpiece. Networking and hawking our wares takes a lot out of us. We cringe.

Photo credit: Shiny Things via Visualhunt.com / CC BY-NC

But here’s the thing. Marketing your book once it’s published is in our hands. We have to get out there and let the world know it exists. I was doing just that this weekend. I participated as a vendor in an Expo that my town does every year, and this year they had an author’s corner. I was the only YA author there, and when there were lulls in the traffic, I chatted with the authors beside me. We started talking about marketing our books, and I received a great idea from another author who wrote his book on leadership. His target market was companies, while mine was young readers.

Not only did I get a great idea from him, (I can’t tell you what it is yet, because I want to see if it works)  but I developed a relationship with him. So, if anyone asks him if he knows a great YA series for their child, he’s going to remember me and recommend my books. This is how that infamous word of mouth everyone talks about gets started.

Now the downside of doing expos, craft shows, and book fairs is that we don’t know what kind of traffic we’re going to get, and we don’t know if our target market is going to be there. So pick these with care. I sold quite a few books at this expo and I’m doing another one in June that’s geared toward kids.

These expos can be a lot of work, but once you get the routine down, it’s fairly easy to set up your booth and take it down. I always bring my computer, too. So if it is slow, I can work on my current WIP. That way I don’t feel like I wasted my day.

I believe we must do these physical appearances as well as have a presence online. So pick a social media forum that works for you. Preferably one that your target market also uses and try and build relationships with your followers.

Social media dataflows

Photo credit: Anne Helmond via Visualhunt / CC BY-NC-ND

It’s important to build relationships with book bloggers as well, or blog tour hosts who have relationships with bloggers. In my opinion, blog tours are essential to getting the word out about your books. They not only provide reviews which every author needs, but they provide exposure as well. This means you’ll have to do some research to find out which blog tour will work best for you. Now, I’ve organized my own tours, done free tours, and paid for tours. The one that has worked best for me is “The Magic of Books Promotions.”

Not only did I get awesome exposure, but I sold the most books I’ve ever sold during a blog tour. This gal works hard for her authors and she’s worth every penny I paid.  I strongly recommend her. Here’s the link if you want to check out her prices.

 

Magic of Books Promotions

http://magicofbookspromo.blogspot.com/

Finding a good tour company can save an author a lot of time. Precious time we could be spending in our writing cave. That’s where we really want to be, isn’t it?

Thanks for stopping by and reading my post, if you have any ideas you’d like to share with other authors please leave a comment! I’d love to hear from you!

 

 

Posted in Family, Holiday Posts

My Trip to Chizen Nitza

 

Hello everyone. I hope all is well with you! I’m back today and I thought I’d touch on a lighter subject because my last few posts have been about some pretty heavy topics, so today, I thought I’d talk about something a little more fun.

Spring break is coming up and I know many people travel during this time, so I thought I’d write a blog post about one of my best vacations. It was probably twenty years ago when I went, so I’m sure some things have changed. (It was that time before kids.) 🙂 It was the time I traveled to Cancun.

I don’t know about you, but waking to the sound of the waves breaking on the shore is an incredible experience for me. I automatically relax whenever I’m by the water, so being that close to the ocean was a special treat.

I loved sitting in those chaise lounges and reading on the beach. It’s so relaxing, but that’s not the only thing I did, although it would’ve been enough. I also visited Chichen Itza. I was awestruck.

The sophistication of the architecture was astounding. I climbed the steps of the largest structure, El Castillo or “The Castle.” It rises from the pale dust and looms above the other structures in the area. It’s also called the Pyramid of Kulkultan and stands seventy nine feet tall. It embodies Mayan myth along with natural astronomical cycles.

Photo credit: kangotraveler via Visual Hunt / CC BY

The phenomenon that El Castillo is famous for happens twice a year, at the spring and fall equinoxes. I haven’t seen this, but I bet it’s amazing. What happens is as the equinox sun sets the play of light and shadow create the appearance of a serpent slithering down the pyramid. I don’t know about you, but I think that would be a spectacular sight to see.

This type of sophisticated architecture suggests a highly intelligent people. Historians haven’t found any stone cutting tools among the ruins which has them scratching their heads. They can’t figure out how they created these structures without them.

There are other structures to explore also. El Caracol is sometimes referred to as “the observatory.” There is plenty of evidence that suggests this cylindrical building was used to observe the heavens. El Caracol seems to be aligned with the movements of Venus. This planet had tremendous significance to the Mayans. They used its movements to plan raids and battles.

Studying these structures made me want to research the Mayan people and find out more about them. I’d love to find out how they disappeared. Many historians theorize that the downfall was brought about by a natural disaster or war. Still others believe there was civil strife, an environmental change, or a famine.

 

Photo credit: Cornell University Library via Visualhunt.com / No known copyright restrictions

 The cause of their downfall remains a mystery to this day.  I hope historians uncover the truth and let the world know what happened. Visiting the ruins was one of the highlights of my trip, and I’d strongly recommend stopping by and checking them out while you’re in Cancun. You’ll be glad you did.

Thanks for stopping by and reading my post. Do you have any favorite places you’d recommend for spring break? Leave a comment. I’d love to hear from you!

 

 

 

 

Posted in Parenting, Teen

Dealing with the Pain of Ostracization

 

Hello everyone. I hope all is well with you. I’m back today and I’m talking about Ostracization. Did you know rejecting, ostracizing, or dissing one of your peers can have major effects on their immune system? If sustained, these changes can increase risk for heart disease, stroke, diabetes, mental illness, and some cancers.

This worries me as a parent. How do we combat the effects of this behavior? I’m sure everyone has faced this type of rejection before. It is very painful and can create depression and anxiety in our child.

Did you know that chronic ostracization can lead to violent behavior? According to a study performed of fifteen school shootings, eight seven percent of them were a direct result of ongoing exclusion.  This is alarming.  (For more information click this link: http://www.alternet.org/culture/social-death-penalty-why-being-ostracized-hurts-even-more-bullying)

 

Photo credit: danielfoster437 via VisualHunt.com / CC BY-NC-SA

Since school shootings are on the rise, we need to combat or deal with this problem. Not only to help end violence, but to maintain the mental and physical well-being of our children.

Why are certain people ostracized?

That is a good question. Ostracization expresses a group fear. It can be either physical or spiritual.  The person being ostracized is considered a threat in some way.

The problem is the communication between the group and the individual ceases. The individual may not even know how he’s threatening the group, so there is no possibility of recourse.

What can you do if your teen is ostracized?

 

Photo credit: Ed Yourdon via VisualHunt.com / CC BY-NC-SA

Well, the first thing we need to do as parents is realize there is a cycle your child will go through.  Click the link below for more information:

http://ostracism-awareness.com/recovery/

  1. There is a period of grieving. The individual will mourn the loss of the group.
  2. After that the individual happily removes anything that reminds them of the person or group ostracizing them.
  3. The next stage is Lifting. The person is distracted by life and let’s go of the group that ostracized him. The distraction of life lifts the person out of the grief cycle and they move forward.

Ways to help your teen deal with Ostracization:

  1. Keep the lines of communication open with your teen. If he’s willing to talk to you about what’s happening, you’ll be able to help him deal with this problem.
  2. Be sure your child can identify the difference between unkind behavior and bullying.
  3. Discuss what is controllable and what isn’t. We have no control over other people’s behavior, but we do have control over how we react to it. Discuss ways your child can cope with this and deal with the feelings this type of behavior brings out.
  4. Give advice but don’t fix things. It’s natural for parents to want to step in and fix the situation for their children, but it’s not recommended. Instead, let your child decide how he wants to cope with it and support his decision. This will go a long way to building self-esteem.
  5. Encourage participation in outside activities. Help your child develop new friendships and rebuild his support system. This can be extra-curricular activities at school, sports, or church groups.
  6. Consider outside help. If your teen seems depressed or isn’t coping well call a professional to help.

 

For more information click the link below:

http://bullying.about.com/od/Victims/a/How-To-Help-Your-Child-Deal-With-Being-Ostracized.htm

 

Thanks for stopping by my blog today. I hope I’ve given you some good information on ways to help your teen deal with rejection. It’s painful, but they can recover. If you’d like to share your ideas leave a comment. I’d love to hear from you!

 

Related Articles:

Can We Prevent Mass Shootings?

 

Volunteering: Another Solution to Teen Angst

 

What is the Underlying cause of Violence in our Schools?