Posted in Parenting, Teen

Is the Instalove in YA books setting our teens up for Disappointment?

Hello everyone, I hope all is well with you. I’m back today after a three day Writer’s Conference that I thoroughly enjoyed. It gave me the extra incentive I needed to tackle a couple of projects that I’ve been thinking about and I’m going to start on those soon.

I’ve finally finished my personal editing process for my fourth novel and I’m excited about it. It’s a coming of age novel and it’s grittier than my past work. I’ve branched out into new territory and that’s exhilarating for me.

I’ve also been reading more too. I’ve just finished Rainbow Rowell’s “Fangirl.”

 

It was a great story; however, I didn’t like it as much as “Eleanor and Park.”

The main thing that I enjoyed about “Fangirl” is the fact that the love story between Cath and Levi wasn’t instalove like you find in other young adult books. This is important, in my opinion, because it gives a more realistic view of what love is supposed to be like for our young people.

Instalove or love at first sight is unrealistic and if the stories that portray it are the first glimpse of what love is like for our young girls, I think it sets them up for disappointment. They’re looking for something that doesn’t exist.

In my opinion, love at first sight should actually be called attraction at first sight. I agree we can become attracted to someone just by his or her physical presence, but this should never be mistaken for love.

As parents and educators, we need to teach this to our girls. Boys need to learn it too, but many of them don’t read the instalove books that young girls do, so they don’t receive the same misconstrued message.

In my opinion, we need to teach our teens communication skills that will help them negotiate the turbulent emotions they’ll feel when they embark on that treacherous trail of love. Especially that first love. Nothing will burn as deep as this first one.

Both of Rainbow Rowell’s books do this. Another book that shows us that love starts out as friendship is “The Fault in our Stars” by John Green. Real love always starts out that way.

Thanks for stopping by and reading my post. What are your thoughts on instalove in our books for teens? I’d love to read them, so leave a comment!

 

 

Posted in reviews

My thoughts on “The Fault in our Stars” by John Green

Hello everyone, I hope all is well with you! I’m back today with another book review. I just finished reading John Green’s new book, “The Fault in our Stars.”

I must say, I absolutely loved this book. It’s very emotional, but with humorous parts that captured the essence of the characters’ personalities beautifully. I really liked the two main characters and the way they looked out for each other.

Hazel Grace is a wonderful girl who has terminal cancer and she meets Augustus at a Support Group meeting. The story is about how these two meet and fall in love even though the odds are stacked against them.

It’s a story about granting last wishes and even though there’s a lot of humor in it, the deeper message comes shining through. I would highly recommend this book. This is hands down the best John Green book I’ve read.

The cover and blurb are below.

The Fault in Our Stars is a love story, one of the most genuine and moving ones in recent American fiction, but it’s also an existential tragedy of tremendous intelligence and courage and sadness.” —Lev Grossman, TIME Magazine

Despite the tumor-shrinking medical miracle that has bought her a few years, Hazel has never been anything but terminal, her final chapter inscribed upon diagnosis. But when a gorgeous plot twist named Augustus Waters suddenly appears at Cancer Kid Support Group, Hazel’s story is about to be completely rewritten.

Insightful, bold, irreverent, and raw, The Fault in Our Stars is award-winning-author John Green’s most ambitious and heartbreaking work yet, brilliantly exploring the funny, thrilling, and tragic business of being alive and in love.

Thanks for stopping by to read my review. I’d love to read your thoughts, so if you’re so inclined leave a comment! 🙂

Posted in reviews, Teen

Book Review of “Looking for Alaska”

Hello everyone. I hope all is well with you. I’ve been up to the cottage this week enjoying the hot weather before school starts. I can’t believe summer is almost over and neither can my boys.

A few weeks ago, I read the book “Looking for Alaska” by John Green. I enjoyed the story and the cover and blurb are below:

Winner of the Michael L. Printz Award An ALA Best Book for Young Adults An ALA Quick Pick A Los Angeles Times 2005 Book Prize Finalist A New York Public Library Book for the Teen Age A 2005 Booklist Editor’s Choice A 2005 School Library Journal Best Book of the Year Before. Miles “Pudge” Halter is done with his safe life at home. His whole life has been one big non-event, and his obsession with famous last words has only made him crave “the Great Perhaps” even more (Francois Rabelais, poet). He heads off to the sometimes crazy and anything-but-boring world of Culver Creek Boarding School, and his life becomes the opposite of safe. Because down the hall is Alaska Young. The gorgeous, clever, funny, sexy, self-destructive, screwed up, and utterly fascinating Alaska Young. She is an event unto herself. She pulls Pudge into her world, launches him into the Great Perhaps, and steals his heart. Then. . . . After. Nothing is ever the same.

My thoughts:

“Looking for Alaska” is the story that’s told from Miles point of view. Miles is sent away to boarding school where he meets vivacious Alaska, and his life is never the same.

Miles not only meets Alaska, but a number of new friends as well. The story documents their adventures and Miles’ reactions to them.  It’s a great novel and I like reading the story from a young boy’s point of view. There aren’t many stories that are told from that view point.

The story revolves around Miles’ fascination with Alaska and his reaction when she abruptly dies. All of her friends experience the guilt of letting her drive while she was under the influence. It was sad and maybe that’s why I didn’t like it as much as “Paper Towns.”  It deals with death and the possibility that Alaska committed suicide.

It delves into this dark issue and brings back some of the painful memories we all have of high school and our own dark days. I must say that I will probably pick up another John Green book even though this one was on the sad side for me.

Posted in reviews, Teen

Book Review of “Paper Towns” by John Green

Hello Everyone! I hope all is well with you.  I hope everyone is enjoying their summer. I know I am! The summer season goes by waaaayy to fast for me, so I try to fit as much fun as I can in during those three short months.

We were on vacation a couple of weeks ago and I actually had some down time. J So, I spent time lounging in the sun and reading! Yes, reading. It’s been a long time since I’ve sat down and just enjoyed a book! I’ve been so busy with my own writing and promoting that I’ve put reading on the back burner.

Well, needless to say, I read a book while sitting in the sun and enjoying the breeze that cooled my skin.  The book I read is titled “Paper Towns” by John Green.

When Margo Roth Spiegelman beckons Quentin Jacobsen in the middle of the night—dressed like a ninja and plotting an ingenious campaign of revenge—he follows her. Margo’s always planned extravagantly, and, until now, she’s always planned solo. After a lifetime of loving Margo from afar, things are finally looking up for Q . . . until day breaks and she has vanished. Always an enigma, Margo has now become a mystery. But there are clues. And they’re for Q.

 

 

I must say that I really enjoyed the book. I loved the character Margo. Such a brave girl and to see her through the eyes of Quentin who has had a crush on her forever was unique. I haven’t read that many books that gives the boys perspective on the “high school crush” theme.

I enjoyed the bond that Quentin developed with his two closest friends, Ben and Radar. It reminded me of my high school days and the bonds of friendship that I had developed with my friends.  I also enjoyed the secret crush that Quentin had on Margo and how she became a mystery that he needed to figure out.

That is the theme of this story, figuring out Margo Roth Spieglman. In the beginning, I said that she was brave and she was. I loved her character, her ability to find fun in any situation and her ability to stand up to her parents.

In the story, she chooses to disappear and Quentin is bent on finding her. He gets his friends involved and they travel cross country following clues that she has left behind for Quentin.

This story kept me turning the pages I wanted to solve the mystery of Margo Roth Spieglman just as much as Quentin did. The ending was a little sad. I’m a big believer in a happy ending so when Margo is found and they find out that she didn’t really want to be…well a few sparks fly.

It was also bittersweet to find out that while Quentin had been harboring a crush on Margo, she had been harboring a crush on him.  It reminded me of high school in so many ways and the secret crushes we all harbor and never get a chance to act upon.  So there you have it, my review of “Paper Towns” by John Green. It’s well worth the read! I’ll be getting another one of his books for my next trip up north!

Thanks for stopping by my blog and taking the time to read my review. If you’d like to give me a suggestion for my next book, please do! Leave me a comment. I’m always looking for good reads!