My thoughts on Video Games

Hello Everyone! I hope all is well with you! I’m here today talking about video games. My kids love them and when I was a kid I loved them too.

They could play them for hours if I let them. The game they love to play now is called Mine craft. At first, I didn’t get it. It seemed like such a pointless game. But then I had someone explain it to me and they put it in terms I could understand. It’s like Digital Legos and can be addicting. Well…Digital Legos… it can’t be that bad. I mean how violent can Legos be?

So, in that respect I don’t have a problem with Mine craft. In fact, it can be quite educational. I’ve explained to my boys that what is happening on the video game is Fiction. They learned about fiction and non-fiction in first grade so whenever I can I reinforce those lessons.

By playing Mine craft, my boys have been questioning what is fact and what is fiction. They will ask me questions like, is iron ore real? And I’ll say I don’t know, let’s look it up on the Internet. Well, after we research it and they learn iron ore is real…they’re on to the next question. Are cave spiders real?  And on it goes. We can spend a couple of hours researching these things that they were not even aware of if they hadn’t played Mine craft. So, in that respect, I’m glad my kids enjoy the game.

However, I do have a problem with video games as a whole. In my opinion, video games are a passive activity. What I mean is; it doesn’t require a lot of physical activity to play them. The industry is trying to combat this by attempting to make them more interactive. There are now dance games and sports games where the individual has to get up and move to play. This is a step in the right direction.

But, it doesn’t take the place of really getting involved and playing a game of soccer or baseball. This is where video games are unhealthy if they are played too much.

When kids play video games for hours on end or shut themselves in their rooms and play into the wee hours of the night then parents need to curtail their use. In my opinion, video games are okay if used in moderation.

Think about this, a child can’t play baseball for hours on end because they get tired and need a rest. I feel we should take that as a guideline, your child’s brain needs a rest too. But since playing video games is not physically taxing it’s easy to let an hour stretch into two… or three… or four.

As a parent I don’t ban video games from my home because they can be educational if used in the right way. But I do feel that they shouldn’t be the only activity my kids engage in. So, I limit the time my kids can play them.

In lieu of video games, I get the board games out. 🙂 That’s right good old fashioned board games…you remember those, right? Monopoly and Clue?

Just last night my sons and I played Monopoly. It was a great bonding experience, plus it’s educational too. They are still learning about money and how to count it in school, what a great way to reinforce that learning experience by playing a game about the exchange of money for goods and services.

Don’t overlook those oldies but goodies! We play Clue too! What a great way to teach your child to use their powers of deduction. 🙂 Kids will need that skill in life too!

And if all else fails…you could get the books out! 😉

Thanks for stopping by my blog and reading my post. I would love to read your comments on video games or the oldies but goodies! So please share!

Advertisements

About Lisa Orchard

I'm a Young Adult Author with two new series, "The Starlight Chronicles" and "The Super Spies." The first one's a coming of age series and the second one's a mystery/thriller series. I'm also the mother of two boys who keep me hopping and they're my inspiration for everything. When I'm not shuttling my boys to school or a play date, I'm writing. When I'm not writing, I'm reading, hiking, or sometimes running. I love anything chocolate and scary movies too.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

11 Responses to My thoughts on Video Games

  1. Teri says:

    I think you are spot on Lisa! I felt the same way when my kids were younger. They also loved Trouble and Sorry board games at that age! Getting outside as much as possible in their free time was a goal for us as well! You are a great mom!

  2. I LOVED Clue as a child, but my kids never got into it. Sorry, Parcheesi, UNO, Phase 10…those are the games my kids liked to play with me. We have video game rules in our house. We’ve established that video games are a privilege, not a right. We limit the # of days per week that they’re allowed, and on those days, we’ve capped the # of hours allowed. My young teen likes Minecraft, but he also enjoys war-based games. These games don’t always bring out the best in him. They’re highly competitive, and he finds that he has to develop the skills to be successful. He often complains that the game “cheats” or that something has happened that is “impossible.” I try to make these moments teachable moments. I try to explain to him that he can’t lose his temper. It takes time, practice, and effort to improve at any skill, video games included. He has, on more than one occasion, lost his video game privileges because he allowed his temper to control his actions and words. Children who compete in sports don’t get to have unreasonable outbursts without consequences, and I feel that it’s the same with video games. When he is in control of his reaction to a video game, what my son often does is, as he realizes he’s getting too upset with a game, he’ll back out of it and go play Minecraft for a while instead. I’m trying to help him understand that he has choices…and that his choices (good and bad) have consequences (good and bad). Here’s to hoping it all pays off in the long run! 🙂

    • Lisa Orchard says:

      Thanks for stopping by Heather! I appreciate you sharing your teachable moments! I’ll have to remember that when my kids lose their tempers while playing these games. You’ve got a great point and it’s a hard lesson for little ones to learn. 🙂

  3. Mary Uhles says:

    Ran across this post on Twitter. Interesting points and I agree about the passivity. I’m always amazed that one beautiful summer evenings there are not more kids out in our neighborhood 😦 I actually don’t allow video consoles for my kids just because I don’t want to be bugged to buy the more offensive games later on when they’re teens. But i don’t really mind them playing at friends houses… however because they don’t play video games at home, they are not very good at it… so they lose to their friends…… and then they want to play something else…. Mom’s subversive plan is working (for now anyway lol).

  4. I’m still waiting for the Super Spies video to come out, Lisa. Would love all the mystery solving you could do! LOL! Great post!

  5. elisestokes says:

    My son recently decided he’s had enough of Mind craft, which has made us all happy. I didn’t have a problem with the game; it was the interaction between the boys playing it together via headsets. Drama galore!

    • Lisa Orchard says:

      Thanks for stopping by Elise! So far there hasn’t been too much drama…but they did just get the game in May…so maybe there’s more to come. 🙂 It might be a good way to teach them how to deal with frustration. I don’t know, we shall see. 🙂

  6. Pingback: This is my life | rubyneve

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s